BioEYES Standards Alignment
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Next Generation Science Standards*

The Next Generation Science Standards were developed by a consortium of 26 states and by the National Science Teachers Association, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the National Research Council, and Achieve with the intent of helping students understand the scientific process of developing and testing ideas while evaluating scientific evidence. The state of Maryland plans to fully implement the standards by the 2017-18 school year. [Source]


MS.Growth, Development, and Reproduction of Organisms

Science and Engineering Practices:

  • Analyzing and Interpreting Data
  • Analyzing data in 6-8 builds on K-5 experiences and progresses to extending quantitative analysis to investigations, distinguishing between correlation and causation, and basic statistical techniques of data and error analysis.

    • Analyze and interpret data to provide evidence for phenomena. (MS-LS2-1)
  • Engaging in Argument from Evidence
  • Engaging in argument from evidence in 6-8 builds on K-5 experiences and progresses to constructing a convincing argument that supports or refutes claims for either explanations or solutions about the natural and described world(s).

    • Construct an oral and written argument supported by empirical evidence and scientific reasoning to support or refute an explanation or a model for a phenomenon or a solution to a problem. (MS-LS2-4)

Disciplinary Core Ideas:

  • LS2.A: Interdependent Relationships in Ecosystems

    • Organisms, and populations of organisms, are dependent on their environmental interactions both with other living things and with nonliving factors. (MS-LS2-1)
    • Growth of organisms and population increases are limited by access to resources. (MS-LS2-1)

Crosscutting Concepts:

  • Cause and Effect

    • Cause and effect relationships may be used to predict phenomena in natural or designed systems. (MS-LS2-1)

  • Stability and Change

    • Small changes in one part of a system might cause large changes in another part. (MS-LS2-4)

MS.Interdependent Relationships in Ecosystems

Disciplinary Core Ideas:

  • LS2.A: Interdependent Relationships in Ecosystems

    • Similarly, predatory interactions may reduce the number of organisms or eliminate whole populations of organisms. Mutually beneficial interactions, in contrast, may become so interdependent that each organism requires the other for survival. Although the species involved in these competetive, predatory, and mutually beneficial interactions vary across ecosystems, the patterns of interactions of organisms with their environments, both living and nonliving, are shared. (MS-LS2-2)

  • LS4.D: Biodiversity and Humans

    • Changes in biodiversity can influence humans’ resources, such as food, energy, and medicines, as well as ecosystem services that humans rely on—for example, water purification and recycling. (secondary to MS-LS2-5)

  • ETS1.B: Developing Possible Solutions

    • There are systematic processes for evaluating solutions with respectto how well they meet the criteria and constraints of a problem. (secondary to MS-LS2-5)

Crosscutting Concepts:

  • Patterns

    • Patterns can be used to identify cause and effect relationships.

  • Stability and Change

    • Small changes in one part of a system might cause large changes in another part. (MS-LS2-4)
Connections to Engineering, Technology, and Applications of Science
  • Influence of Science, Engineering, and Technology and the Natural World

    • The use of technologies and any limitations on their use are driven by individual or societal needs, desires, and values; by the findings of scientific research; and by differences in such factors as climate, natural resources, and economic conditions. Thus technology use varies from region to region and over time. (MS-LS2-5)
Connections to Nature of Science
  • Science Addresses Questions About the Natural and Material World

    • Scientific knowledge can describe the consequences of actions but does not necessarily prescribe the decisions that society takes. (MS-LS2-5)

MS.Growth, Development, and Reproduction of Organisms

Students who demonstrate an understanding can:

  • MS-LS1-4. Use argument based on empirical evidence and scientific reasoning to support an explanation for how characteristic animal behaviors and specialized plant structures affect the probability of successful reproduction of animals and plants respectively.
  • MS-LS1-5. Construct a scientific explanation based on evidence for how environmental and genetic factors influence the growth of organisms.

Disciplinary Core Ideas:

  • LS1.B: Growth and Development of Organisms

    • Animals engage in characteristic behaviors that increase the odds of reproduction. (MS-LS1-4)

Crosscutting Concepts:

  • Structure and Function

    • Complex and microscopic structures and systems can be visualized, modeled, and used to describe how their function depends on the shapes, composition, and relationships among its parts, therefore complex natural structures/systems can be analyzed to determine how they function. (MS-LS3-1)

MS.Earth's Systems

Students who demonstrate an understanding can:

  • MS-ESS2-4. Develop a model to describe the cycling of water through Earth's systems driven by energy from the sun and the force of gravity.

Science and Engineering Practices:

  • Developing and Using Models
  • Modeling in 6-8 builds on K-5 experiences and progresses to developing, using, and revising models to describe, test, and predict more abstract phenomena and design systems.

    • Develop a model to describe unobservable mechanisms. (MS-ESS2-4)

Disciplinary Core Ideas:

  • ESS2.C: The Roles of Water in Earth's Surface Processes

    • Water continually cycles among land, ocean, and atmosphere via transpiration, evaporation, condensation and crystallization, and precipitation, as well as downhill flows on land. (MS-ESS2-4)

Crosscutting Concepts:

  • Energy and Matter

    • Within a natural or designed system, the transfer of energy drives the motion and/or cycling of matter. (MS-ESS2-4)

MS.Weather and Climate

Students who demonstrate an understanding can:

  • MS-ESS2-5. Collect data to provide evidence for how the motions and complex interactions of air masses results in changes in weather conditions.

Science and Engineering Practices:

  • Asking Questions and Defining Problems
  • Asking questions and defining problems in 6-8 builds on K-5 experiences and progresses to specifying relationships between variables, and clarifying arguments and models.

    • Ask questions to identify and clarify evidence of an argument. (MS-ESS3-5)

Disciplinary Core Ideas:

  • ESS2.C: The Roles of Water in Earth's Surface Processes

    • The complex patterns of the changes and the movement of water in the atmosphere, determined by winds, landforms, and ocean temperatures and currents, are major determinants of local weather patterns (MS-ESS2-5)

MS.Human Impacts

Students who demonstrate an understanding can:

  • MS-ESS3-3. Apply scientific principles to design a method for monitoring and minimizing a human impact on the environment.
  • MS-ESS3-4. Construct an argument supported by evidence for how increases in human population and per-capita consumption of natural resources impact Earth's systems.

Science and Engineering Practices:

  • Constructing Explanations and Designing Solutions
  • Constructing explanations and designing solutions in 6-8 builds on K-5 experiences and progresses to include constructing explanations and designing solutions supported by multiple sources of evidence consistent with scientific ideas, principles, and theories.

    • Apply scientific principles to design an object, tool, process or system. (MS-ESS3-3)
  • Engaging in Argument from Evidence
  • Engaging in argument from evidence in 6-8 builds on K-5 experiences and progresses to constructing a convincing argument that supports or refutes claims for either explanations or solutions about the natural and described world(s).

    • Construct an oral and written argument supported by empirical evidence and scientific reasoning to support or refute an explanation or a model for a phenomenon or a solution to a problem. (MS-ESS3-4)

Disciplinary Core Ideas:

  • ESS3.C: Human Impacts on Earth's Systems

    • Typically as human populations and per-capita consumption of natural resources increase, so do the negative impacts on Earth unless the activities and technologies involved are engineered otherwise. (MS-ESS3-3),(MS-ESS3-4)
Connections to Engineering, Technology, and Applications of Science
  • Influence of Science, Engineering, and Technology and the Natural World

    • The use of technologies and any limitations on their use are driven by individual or societal needs, desires, and values; by the findings of scientific research; and by differences in such factors as climate, natural resources, and economic conditions. Thus technology use varies from region to region and over time. (MS-ESS3-2),(MS-ESS3-3)

Crosscutting Concepts:

  • Cause and Effect

    • Cause and effect relationships may be used to predict phenomena in natural or designed systems. (MS-ESS3-4)

*“Next Generation Science Standards” is a registered trademark of Achieve. Neither Achieve nor the lead states and partners that developed the Next Generation Science Standards was involved in the production of, and does not endorse, this product. [Return]

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